Twisted Parasites

Strepsipterans, or “twisted wing flies” (not really flies, I might add) are one of myriad creatures that prey on bees. The females grow between segments of the abdomen in a way that looks quite painful.
A "twisted" female living between the abdominal segments of a hapless wasp. Drawing by H T Fernald (1921) in Applied Entomology.
A “twisted” female living between the abdominal segments of a hapless wasp (drawing by H T Fernald (1921) in Applied Entomology). I really enjoyed this account that the CSIRO blog gives of Strepsiteran reproduction. I hope you do, too.

News @ CSIRO

By Kim Pullen – Australian National Insect Collection

Insects hide their enormous diversity well. We may hear that several thousand species live in and around our town or city, but where are they all?

They are in every patch of garden or vegetation. They are on nearly every bird or mammal that walks, runs or flies around us (think lice and ticks for example).

We don’t see a lot of them because most are small, some minute, and live hidden from our view. And if they are a rare species as well, then even entomologists (scientists that study insects) don’t get to see them much. The twisted-wing fly, which is actually not really a fly at all, is one such insect.

Strepsiptera is the taxonomic group these enigmatic creatures belong to, so we can also call them strepsipterans. That name is from the Greek, streptos meaning twisted, and pteron meaning…

View original post 331 more words

Advertisements

2 responses to “Twisted Parasites

  1. Ouch! Looks like a permanent baby not wanting to be born.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s